The British are told they can save more than £400 by using less energy

The British will be told they could save more than £400 by using less energy in a new information campaign by government ministers.

The £25 million marketing program will try to discourage people from using energy unnecessarily as bills run high during the winter.

MPs and celebrities will appear in advertisements and on social media to tell the public to cut back on their boilers, turn off radiators in empty rooms and opt for showers over baths, The Times reports.

Chancellor Jeremy Hunt said the British have a responsibility to cut energy consumption by 15 percent to avoid the country being “blackmailed” by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Yesterday, Hunt told the Treasury Select Committee, “For most people, we need you to play your part in reducing our energy dependence on whatever Putin decides to do in Ukraine.

Yesterday Treasury Secretary Jeremy Hunt told the Treasury Select Committee: ‘For most people, we need you to do your part in reducing our energy dependence on whatever Putin decides to do in Ukraine’

Mr Hunt said Britain has a responsibility to cut energy by 15 per cent to avoid the country being 'blackmailed' by Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured)

Mr Hunt said Britain has a responsibility to cut energy by 15 per cent to avoid the country being ‘blackmailed’ by Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured)

‘That is not only national, but for every household. We think the £500 we’re offering to help people save next year, at current gas prices, if people do the 15 per cent, they could save that £500 themselves in the amount they pay in subsequent years.

“So we try to help people help themselves. We will give them a pillow this year and next year, but we need people to change their behaviour.’

Officials have identified eight changes they believe will save consumers £420 a year without them realizing it.

They include lowering boiler temperatures – which can save £80; turn off heating when going out – saving £105; turning off electrical appliances instead of leaving them on standby – a saving of £55; and having showers instead of baths – which could save £15.

Other ‘babysitting’ suggestions around lowering thermostats and shorter showers have been rejected due to their negative effects on well-being.

The £25m marketing program will try to discourage people from using energy unnecessarily as bills run high in winter, by lowering boiler temperatures and turning off radiators in empty rooms

The £25m marketing program will try to discourage people from using energy unnecessarily as bills run high in winter, by lowering boiler temperatures and turning off radiators in empty rooms

The Chancellor has also announced an additional £6bn of energy efficiency funding from 2025 as households are encouraged to install attic insulation and thermostatic radiator valves.

Former Prime Minister Liz Truss had previously blocked plans for a public education campaign on energy consumption because she was “ideologically against” it. But her veto has since been overturned by successor Rishi Sunak.

The government hopes to kick-start the campaign before Christmas and will follow similar campaigns in France and Germany.

One key difference, however, is Britain’s focus on saving money, as opposed to the continent’s push for patriotism after Putin cut off the gas supply.

On Tuesday, the Chancellor underlined the need to put public finances back on a ‘sustainable path’ as ​​loans reached £13.5bn in October.

That was £4.4bn higher than last year and the fourth-highest figure for the month ever – albeit at a slight point much lower than analysts had expected at £21bn.

Total government spending rose to £91.2bn in October after central government spending rose by £6.5bn to £76.8bn for the month.

The ONS estimated this included around £3bn for the cost of energy support schemes, including £1.9bn for the £400 home energy rebates.

Mr Hunt (right) also revealed that he has asked the Treasury to investigate how much could be raised by closing the controversial tax loophole previously used by Prime Minister Rishi Sunak's wife Akshata Murty (left), who had to say in April that she would pay UK tax on her worldwide income

Mr Hunt (right) also revealed that he has asked the Treasury to investigate how much could be raised by closing the controversial tax loophole previously used by Prime Minister Rishi Sunak’s wife Akshata Murty (left), who had to say in April that she would pay UK tax on her worldwide income

Mr Hunt said he wished there hadn’t been so much political ‘instability’ in the UK over the past year.

When told that the Conservatives have delivered three Prime Ministers and four Chancellors in that time, he told the Commons Treasury Committee: ‘I wish we hadn’t had that level of instability.

“But I’ve put together a fall statement that aims to restore economic stability and consistency in economic policymaking, and I hope we can turn a page on all that instability.”

He argued that the “primary” causes of the current economic challenges facing the UK are the “two major shocks” of the pandemic and the energy crisis.

“I think it’s wrong to say that this is somehow a uniquely British problem in terms of economic instability,” he said.

He also revealed that he has asked the Treasury to investigate how much could be raised by closing the controversial non-dom tax loophole.

The Chancellor and Prime Minister Rishi Sunak have come under fire for refusing to abolish the scheme for those who live in this country but do not pay UK tax on their offshore income, with Labor accusing the pair of swindling the super-rich fencing their fair share.

Mr Hunt has disputed suggestions that the move could bring in £3bn a year, arguing that he would rather wealthy people ‘stay here and spend their money here’ than move abroad.

But he admitted last week that he had not received estimates from the Treasury on the financial consequences of ending the prime minister’s multimillionaire wife’s status.

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